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What Works Well?

Active Reviewing Tips 3.1   What Works Well?
  1. THEME: What Works Well
  2. TIPS: Appreciative Inquiry
  3. LINKS: Appreciative Inquiry
  4. NEWS: Open Training Workshops
    1. North Yorkshire, England
    2. Midlands, England
    3. Castlebar, Ireland
    4. Denmark - working with young people
    5. Denmark - outdoor management development
    6. Hong Kong
  5. FUTURE ISSUES
This page is only a small sample of techniques about positive thinking and learning from what works well.

So you will also want to visit this index to success-focused reviewing techniques if you came here looking for ideas about what works well

Active Reviewing Tips for Dynamic Experiential Learning - http://reviewing.co.uk

Roger Greenaway's Active Reviewing Tips 3.1 ~ ISSN 1465-8046
This free opt-in publication from Reviewing Skills Training
reaches over 700 enlightened people a bit like you :-)
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Please forward to friends who share your interests.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

IN THIS ISSUE
~ 1 ~ THEME: What Works Well
~ 2 ~ TIPS: Appreciative Inquiry
~ 3 ~ LINKS: Appreciative Inquiry
~ 4 ~ NEWS: Open Training Workshops
~ 5 ~ FUTURE ISSUES
~ 6 ~ About Active Reviewing Tips
....... and How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ A C T I V E . R E V I E W I N G . T I P S
~ ~ FOR DYNAMIC EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
~ ~ the free monthly newsletter associated with the
~ ~ 'GUIDE TO ACTIVE REVIEWING' http://reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Editor: Roger Greenaway roger@reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Vol. 3.1
~ ~ WHAT WORKS WELL?
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

~ ~ ~ IN THIS ISSUE

This issue of Active Reviewing Tips carries on where the last
one left off.

FIRSTLY: That issue finished with the announcement that there
would be several open training workshops in reviewing skills in
the UK and other countries in the year 2000. Dates are now
confirmed for open workshops in England, Ireland, Denmark and
Hong Kong. Details are in the NEWS section below.

SECONDLY: The last issue featured three parts of a four part
article about 'Developing Potential'.

[You can find the last issue via the NEW archives search page]

# 1. Childhood: Where has all the potential gone?
# 2. Youth Development: How can you raise Self-Esteem?
# 3. Adult Development: What's in your Success Store?
# 4. Organisation Development: Appreciative Inquiry [this issue]

In this issue you will find part 4. All four sections are about
paying attention to what already works well:
REVIEWING BEST PRACTICE RATHER THAN STUDYING FAILURE.

Now, if there's something wrong with the engine of the plane I'm
on, I'd like the flight engineer to fix the problem - instantly.
I would get a little upset if the engineer ignored the
mechanical problem and simply drew our attention to all the good
things - like the view out of the window, the duty free goods and
the sunny weather at our destination. The problem would remain
unsolved and the plane might never arrive :-(

In the NON-mechanical world of personal development and human
relationships, things work a little differently. We have the
CHOICE of paying attention to problems or paying attention to
potential. And we can adjust the balance as we go along.

What's especially interesting about the positive 'developing
potential' route is that far from being a luxury to indulge in
when things are going well, it is an approach that claims
astounding successes precisely when things are NOT going at all
well.

For evidence of the success of this approach with INDIVIDUALS,
look up 'Solution Focused Brief Therapy' (SFBT).

For its success with COMMUNITIES find out about
'Narrative Therapy'.

And for its success with TEAMS and ORGANISATIONS follow the
'Appreciative Inquiry' links in this issue of Active Reviewing
Tips.

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~ 1 ~ THEME: WHAT WORKS WELL?

Before I knew anything about Appreciative Inquiry, I carried out
an investigation into good practice in children's homes. The
report was entitled 'What Works Well?' (1992). My approach to
this project (I have since learned) was very similar to
Appreciative Inquiry.

This was my introduction to 'What Works Well?' ...

" 'WHAT WORKS WELL?' is a one-off publication about working with
young people in care. It is based on interviews with young people
with experience of care and their workers. The emphasis is a
positive one, focusing on good experiences, what works well and
on ideas for improving the quality of care.

"By providing descriptions of 'what works well', it is hoped that
all those with responsibility for work with young people in care
will have a clearer picture of what is possible whenever the
climate is right for developing new practice.

"It is a climate which we can all influence. Exchanging ideas
about 'what works well' can itself help to create the climate in
which good practice develops - and in which young people will
experience care more positively..."

And several interviews later came this conclusion:

"A lot of young people do have very positive experiences in care.
Where it has happened this may have been due to recognisable and
approved 'good practice', but (from what I have been told) it
seems more likely to have resulted simply from staff and young
people finding the time and space to get to know and trust each
other. If time and space cannot be readily found within the home,
then members of staff have found it necessary to put in
'something extra' to create it."

By paying attention to what works well, we notice more of it,
understand more about it, and make more of it happen. In the
language of 'Appreciative Inquiry':

"WHAT WE FOCUS ON BECOMES OUR REALITY".

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~ 2 ~ TIPS: APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY

You may wonder what's 'active' about Appreciative Inquiry. What's
it got to do with 'Active Reviewing'? Before we get to the
'active' bit, I thought you might 'appreciate' knowing a little
more about the ideas on which Appreciative Inquiry is based.


ASSUMPTIONS OF APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY

# 1 In every society, organisation or group, something works.

# 2 What we focus on becomes our reality.

# 3 Reality is created in the moment and there are multiple
realities.

# 4 The act of asking questions of an organisation or group
influences the groups in some way.

# 5 People have more confidence and comfort to journey to the
future (the unknown) when they carry forward parts of the past
(the known).

# 6 If we carry parts of the past forward, they should be what is
best about the past.

# 7 It is important to value differences.

# 8 The language we use creates our reality.

[from 'The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry' - see links below]


SOME QUESTIONS SUPPORTING APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY

Q. Reflecting on your experiences to date what have been the high
points?
(Select an example of when you were making a real difference.
What were the circumstances? Why did it feel good? Who were you
working with? What did you/your client achieve? What was special
about this experience? Describe the story around your example.)

Q. What is it that you value most about yourself, your
distinctive competence, your colleagues, your
clients/organisation?

Q. What gives life to this organisation?

Such review-type questions are then followed by future-looking
questions.

[These sample questions are from an article by Liz Mellish in
the Training Journal (November 99) - see links below.]


AN ACTIVE APPROACH TO APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY

The roots of Appreciative Inquiry are in research, so it is not
surprising to find that questions are at the heart of this
approach. But from an 'Active Reviewing' perspective it is
possible to explore all of these questions in ACTIVE ways. The
simplest way to achieve this is to place 'SHOW', 'DEMONSTRATE',
'RE-ENACT' or 'RE-CREATE' at the beginning of your questions.

But people may not be willing to leap into action unless you have
led up to this point with suitable 'warm-up' exercises.

You will find several ideas for warm-ups in my 'Active Reviewing'
article at:
http://reviewing.co.uk/actrev.htm

For ideas about how to prepare people for reliving their
successes see
http://reviewing.co.uk/success/

Some questions may best be answered through drawings or cartoon
sequences. See:
http://reviewing.co.uk/pictures/intro.htm
Many AI practitioners do ask learners to draw their experiences.

Other questions can be answered by using 'freeze frame' or
other action replay devices. See Action Replay at:
http://reviewing.co.uk/stories/replay.htm

The purpose of using active reviewing methods is to 'give life'
to the method by which you are exploring such questions. Active
reviewing methods allow you to get closer to the realities and
qualities of the living systems that you are investigating
through Appreciative Inquiry.

ACTIVE REVIEWS can be used to generate lively and appreciative
inquiries into living systems and their life-giving features. By
re-enacting what works best, it is possible to enhance the
quality of communication, and create a fuller and finer
appreciation of what works well.

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Please forward to friends who share your interests.
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~ 3 ~ LINKS: Web-based resources for Appreciative Inquiry (AI)

Appreciative Inquiry in Pictures - by David Potter
The traditional approach
http://personal.palouse.net/3d/ai/traditional.gif
The appreciative approach
http://personal.palouse.net/3d/ai/appreciative.gif

Appreciative Inquiry
Learn about David Coopperrider and the origins of AI
http://www.appreciative-inquiry.org

AI Resource Centre and Ann Radford's AI Newsletter
[and the UK source for 'The Thin Book of AI']
http://www.aradford.co.uk/

AI 'Thin Book' What is AI? by Sue Annis Hammond
http://www.thinbook.com/

AI bibliography at Mellish Associates
http://www.mellish.com.au/Reception/airefs.html

AI articles at ODNET
http://www.odnetwork.org/resources/index.php

AI resource list at Taos
http://www.serve.com/taos/appreciative.html

AI-style therapy: Solution Focused Brief Therapy
http://rdz.stjohns.edu/~sft/ [URL may have changed]

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~ 4 ~ NEWS: SITE SEARCH and OPEN TRAINING WORKSHOPS

SITE SEARCH and ARCHIVE SEARCH AT http://reviewing.co.uk

Until recently I have had trouble finding my way around my own
site. What a confession! But I can now find anything on my site
with only one or two clicks. Even better news - so can you!

Amongst the navigational aids I can especially recommend these
three methods for Active Reviewing Tips readers in a hurry to
find an idea for your next session!

# 1. At the top right of the home page http://reviewing.co.uk
select 'Tools for Change' or 'Ezine Archives' from the drop down
box, then type in what you are looking for and click the search
button.

# 2. Go straight to the NEW archives search page There you will find a
hyperlinked list of all back issues. [Have you seen ''How
balanced are your questions?'' in the very first issues?]

# 3: The A-Z Index is the most comprehensive and up to date index
on the site. Just use it as you would use the index of a book.

_________________________________


OPEN TRAINING WORKSHOPS 2000

I am delighted to be offering open trainer-training courses in
reviewing (and related topics) over the next few months with
    Institute of Adventure Counseling (Hong Kong)
    Castlebar College (Ireland)
    XCL (Mid England)
    Log Heights (North England)
    Resonans (Denmark)   youth   OMD

You will find dates, titles, links and contact details below

_________________________________


NORTH YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND (April, May and June 2000)

A series of 3 x 1 day courses for trainers using the outdoors
with Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training

DEVELOP reviewing skills that enable your clients gain maximum
value from your courses.

LEARN how to use reviewing techniques that make the most of
outdoor experiences.

PRACTISE reviewing methods that are as engaging as the activities
themselves.

BECOME more proficient in skills that are central to successful
facilitation.

Venue for all 3 events: Log Heights, Ripley Castle

20th April: reviewing at the BEGINNING of a training course
24th May: reviewing in the MIDDLE of a training course
20th June: reviewing near the END of a training course

Log Heights has since evolved into
Azesta
- same castle, same Shirley, more twist


_________________________________


MIDLANDS, ENGLAND 10-11th May 2000

How to Transfer Learning and give your training lasting impact
with Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training

By taking part in this practical 2 day workshop you will learn
how to improve the chances that the full benefits of your
training are transferred to the 'real' world.

As a participant you will gain ...
* an understanding of key issues in the transfer of learning.
* the know-how to make learning experiences more transferable.
* an expanded toolkit of reviewing techniques that assist transfer
* first-hand experience of 'transfer planning'

Venue: XCL, Reaseheath College, Crewe. 10-11th May

For more information contact Dig Woodvine at
xcl@clevermonkey.freeserve.co.uk

_________________________________


DENMARK 10-11th April 2000

Working with young people in the outdoors
''Pædagogik & Friluftsliv''

Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training
with Thomas Hojland and Henrik Kongsbak, Resonans

The outdoors is an engaging and inspiring place that can work
wonders. The tools and insights you gain from these two days will
help you to ensure that young people gain significant benefit
from their outdoor experiences.

Gilwellhytterne - Houens Odde, 10-11th April

http://www.resonans.dk

For more information contact Thomas Hojland at
info@resonans.dk"

_________________________________


DENMARK  12-13th April 2000

Outdoor Management Development

Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training
with Thomas Hojland and Henrik Kongsbak, Resonans

The first day is about developing teamwork skills. This taps into
the energy source that drives all outdoor training events.
The second day will extend your reviewing toolkit - beyond
questioning skills, metaphor-making and action plans.

Gilwellhytterne - Houens Odde, 12-13th April

http://www.resonans.dk

For more information: contact Thomas Hojland at
info@resonans.dk"

_________________________________


IRELAND  Saturday 11th March 2000

Activities, Games, Adventures, Young People & 'Active Reviewing'
with Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training

Designed for youth workers and 'youth-at-risk' workers,
this one day workshop will help you to strengthen the links
between the activities you use and the aims and issues that you
tackle in your work. Outdoor adventure provides excellent
opportunities for helping young people make breakthroughs in
their personal and social development. Without a suitably
engaging and effective approach to reviewing, these opportunities
can be lost. Through a sensitive and imaginative approach to reviewing you
can help young people exceed their expectations.

Castlebar College, County Mayo

For more information contact Stephen Hannon
stephenh@iol.ie

_________________________________


HONG KONG Saturday February 12th 2000

Making the most of activities through effective reviewing

This one day training event is designed for youth social workers
interested in helping clients to get maximum value from new
activities and interests.

* Telling Stories
* Reviewing What Happened
* Communicating Experiences
* Making the Links

Hong Kong Institute of Adventure Counselling

For more information contact C.K. Chan
chunkuen@ied.edu.hk

_________________________________


MORE WORKSHOPS!

You will find a full list of Reviewing Skills Training Workshops
at: http://reviewing.co.uk/trainingworkshops.htm

You will find a link to 'testimonials' from my home page at
http://reviewing.co.uk

If you want to HOST a CUSTOMISED or OPEN workshop
(after September 2000), please write to me at
roger@reviewing.co.uk

Appreciative comments and critical feedback about Active
Reviewing Tips are always welcome. Tell me what you think. Tell
me what you want. Tell me what you like!

  DON'T JUST DO IT -
    ACTIVELY REVIEW IT !!

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~ 5 ~ FUTURE ISSUES OF ACTIVE REVIEWING TIPS
Future Issues will include: how to use reviewing methods to
develop teamwork skills, leadership skills, learning skills and
transfer skills.

If you would like to request particular reviewing
topics or contribute to them please let me know at
roger@reviewing.co.uk

Please also write if you wish to share ideas or ask questions about 'what works well', 'success-focused reviewing', 'solution-focused therapy', 'appreciatve inquiry' or any other optimistic, rose-tinted, strengths-based approach to learning from experience. I am very open to alternative views or to people concerned about the possible implication that serious problems get ignored - and get worse.
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Please forward to friends who share your interests.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Each month Active Reviewing Tips brings you:

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