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Active Reviewing Tips 4.1   Quick Reviews
  1. INTRO: EDITOR: New Beginnings
  2. TIPS: Quick Reviews
  3. READERS: More Feedback Exercises
  4. LINKS: What is Active Learning?
  5. NEWS: Open Workshops in 2001
  6. SITE UPDATE: What's new at http://reviewing.co.uk
  7. PAST and FUTURE ISSUES


Roger Greenaway's Active Reviewing Tips 4.1 ~ ISSN 1465-8046
A free opt-in publication from Reviewing Skills Training
Mailed only to subscribers. Established 1998. Circulation 1300+.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
IN THIS ISSUE
  1. INTRO: EDITOR: New Beginnings
  2. TIPS: Quick Reviews
  3. READERS: More Feedback Exercises
  4. LINKS: What is Active Learning?
  5. NEWS: Open Workshops in 2001
  6. SITE UPDATE: What's new at http://reviewing.co.uk
  7. PAST and FUTURE ISSUES
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ A C T I V E . R E V I E W I N G . T I P S
~ ~ FOR DYNAMIC EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
~ ~ the free monthly newsletter associated with the
~ ~ ACTIVE REVIEWING GUIDE at
http://reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Editor: Roger Greenaway roger@reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Vol. 4.1
~ ~ Q U I C K . R E V I E W S
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
~ 1 ~ EDITOR: NEW BEGINNINGS
 
In the year 2000 Active Reviewing Tips was more of a quarterly
than a monthly publication. I apologise if you have been missing
your monthly dose of inspiration. In the year 2001 I will get
much closer to the original concept of Active Reviewing Tips as a
monthly publication in which you will typically find:
 
 ~ a practical feature on reviewing tips
 ~ links to sites about active learning methods
 ~ tips, comments and ideas from readers
 ~ what's new in the Active Reviewing Guide
 ~ news of Reviewing Skills Training Workshops
 
Which, I am pleased to say, makes this issue a 'typical' one!
 
As there has been such a gap since the last issue I have not yet
been able to tell you about the major new resource on my site
which is a collection of over 350 books about active learning
called 'Active Learning Books and Reviews'. Several visitors have
contributed reviews already and I am steadily adding several of
my own reviews of some of my favourite books on the subject.
Please let me know what you think about this new resource.
Recommendations and book reviews are always welcome!
(The reviewing section is still a bit thin.)
 
 
~ 2 ~ TIPS: QUICK REVIEWS     Easy to print version

If you review experiences in a hurry and cut corners, don't
expect great results. The good news is that you can learn how to
make the most of just a few minutes - and get reasonably good
results. There is always time for a quick review!

So when you next find that 'review time' is fast disappearing,
refer to the tips below for quick reviews of 1 minute, 2 minutes,
5 minutes or 10 minutes. By developing the art of quick reviewing
you can make the most of opportunities that might otherwise be
lost.

Even if you have all the time you want for reviewing, your
learners will appreciate a variety of pace, activity and style
during longer reviews. You may sometimes want to re-focus long
reviews with a quick exercise. For example, you can introduce
visual methods to assist communication, use action replays to
lighten the mood, make use of dynamic techniques to bring ideas
to life, or conduct instant surveys to gauge opinion.

If you find that you are always short of time for reviewing, step
back and work out why. The usual reason why people run out of
time for reviewing is that it comes at the end of a session. So
consider ending a session with a quick review, and starting the
next session with a longer review.

Starting a session with a review has many advantages. It
certainly increases the chances that learners will make
connections between activities. It also increases the chances
that learners will be refreshed and alert for reviewing - not
tired and longing for a break.

The simple strategy of taking breaks BEFORE reviews instead of
AFTER reviews has many benefits - but it may not always be the
best choice.

Another useful strategy (when short of review time) is to carry
out quick reviews DURING an activity. You can do this by building
reviews into the activity in advance, or just by looking out for
good opportunities to review - and using them!

The techniques described below are 'flipchart-free'. Most require
no resources at all and can be used anywhere at any time. With
such minimal resource requirements, you will find even more time
for reviewing!


5 x 1 MINUTE REVIEWS
A lot of valuable information can be shared in just one minute.
Quick sharing exercises that raise awareness and appreciation of
each other can have a big impact. You can also refer back to
these 'checkpoints' in longer reviews.
 
1.1 CHECK MOOD STATES (UPS AND DOWNS)
To bring out mood changes, ask each person simultaneously  to
show their mood state using simple signals such as thumbs up or
down (or in between). Choose a few points during the activity to
see mood states at each point. If you want everyone to see each
other's signal, first get in a circle, then (at each set of
signals) ask ''Any surprises?''
 
1.2 CHECK ENERGY LEVELS (FUEL GAUGE)
To discover energy levels, ask each person simultaneously to show
their energy level using simple signals. For example: with each
person using their body as a fuel gauge, hands on head = full of
energy, hands on hips = half full, hands on feet = nothing left.
If you want everyone to see each other's signal, first get in a
circle, then (after each set of signals) invite comments. Use
this method to compare energy levels at the start and finish. If
time allows, ask what would help to restore or re-charge energy
levels.
 
1.3 THREE WORDS
''Choose three separate words (not a phrase) that describe what
you experienced during the activity.'' Allow 30 seconds thinking
time, then share in a round. This is usually much quicker than
doing sentence completion in rounds. And it often happens to be
an example of ''less is more'' - a lot can be communicated in
just three words (after a bit of thinking time).
 
1.4 POSITIVE FEEDBACK ABOUT THE GROUP
''10 good things about you as a group during the activity.''
Encourage comments from within the group, but throw in some
yourself. Go beyond 10 if you can - mainly because the first few
comments (however valid they are) tend to be vague and clichéd.
With this method, quantity brings out quality because comments
tend to get more specific. End by asking what they will carry
forward to the next activity.
 
1.5 TAKE TIME OUT (MID-ACTIVITY REVIEWING)
Don't always wait until the end of the activity to review. All of
the above techniques could also be used at 'half-time' or any
time during the activity - for example, during natural breaks,
while waiting for a turn, while having a rest or snack, while
sheltering from the weather.
 

5 x 2 MINUTE REVIEWS
If you have only 2 minutes, say very little, keep things simple
and focus on positives.
 
2.1 STORY TELLING IN ROUNDS
Without any practice or planning and against the clock (say 2
minutes) the group are challenged to tell the story of the last
activity in rounds. Each person may say only one word (or
punctuation mark) when it is their turn. This is a fun
communication exercise requiring a lot of concentration.
 
2.2 THREE PICTURES (MAGIC MOMENTS)
Brief moments of personal reflection (with eyes closed, facing
outwards or lying down). For short reviews keep a positive spin.
Focus on what participants are pleased about, or pleasantly
surprised about. For example: ''Picture three 'magic moments'
from the activity that you would like to remember. Picture 1 is
something you did or said. [pause] Picture 2 is something another
person did or said. [pause] Picture 3 shows a magic/good moment
for the whole group. [pause]''  This is a very brief version of
'Guided Reflection'.
 
2.3 THREE REPLAYS (FREEZE FRAME or CLIPS)
Snapshots or short video clips of moments that participants want
to remember (e.g. fun, success, improvements, surprises,
discoveries, insights). If these moments are caught on camera and
you can provide instant replays - go ahead. But I much prefer
asking people to recreate these moments AS IF they had been
caught on camera. This is much quicker, more active and more
creative. 'Freeze Frame' is an active way of sharing thoughts
from 'Magic Moments'. You can also launch straight into 'Freeze
Frame' without preparation. For more on replays see
http://reviewing.co.uk/stories/replay.htm
 
2.4 POSITIVE FEEDBACK FOR INDIVIDUALS
''2 good things about each person during the activity.''
Encourage comments from within the group, but ensure you have
positive comments ready to give to each person in case anyone
receives little or no feedback. Positive feedback boosts
self-confidence. And by highlighting examples of positive
behaviour, you increase the chances that participants will learn
from each other's examples.
 
2.5 BUDDY TIME
''Talk in pairs about ...''  (Pick a success theme such as
examples of leadership or humour or caring or effort in the
group.) Alternatively, buddies give positive feedback on each
other's performance during the activity. To encourage a balance
of giving and receiving positive feedback, each person takes
turns to make one positive comment at a time.
 

5 x 5 MINUTE REVIEWS
In 5 minutes you may have time for more open questions. A 5
minute review in a whole group of 10 allows an average of only 30
seconds air time for each person. Extend the methods described
above or try out the methods described below.
 
5.1 FORTUNATELY, UNFORTUNATELY
The group tell the story of the last activity, taking it in turns
to say just one sentence beginning with 'Fortunately ...' or
'Unfortunately...'. Go round the circle one at a time. Allow
passing. This is called an 'Alternating Round'. Depending on the
pair of sentence beginnings you choose this can help to create a
balanced view of what happened. This is especially useful when a
group seems over-confident or under-confident.
 
5.2 ACTIVE LISTENING
While you tell the story of what happened, participants show
their feelings at the time. Using head height or hand height they
can show their ups and downs. Moving in and out of a circle they
can show how much they felt involved in a group activity. Using
gestures and facial expressions they can show anything they want
to. To encourage communication with each other, start off in a
circle. Invite help with storytelling if you need it.
 
5.3 INSTANT ACTION REPLAY (REMOTE CONTROL)
Instant action replay of whole (or part) of the activity in the
time available. Explain that you have the remote control and will
be using various buttons e.g. fast forward, rewind, pause, slow
etc. - and may invent some new buttons. No time for preparation.
If time allows, take a risk and hand over the control.
 
5.4 CONNECTING TO A PREVIOUS ACTIVITY
Use 'Alternating Rounds' to investigate questions such as: ''How
was this like/unlike the last activity?'' ''In what ways did you
perform better/worse as a team compared to the last activity?''
To develop a positive view, ask: ''In what ways did your
performance in this activity show that you have learned something
useful from the last one?'' The group respond with action
replays, verbal responses or both.
 
5.5 CONNECTING TO THE NEXT ACTIVITY
''Show me what you want to take from this experience into the
next activity.'' Sub groups prepare short mimes or replays.
Alternatively, individuals choose objects to represent what they
want to take forwards.
 

5 x 10 MINUTE REVIEWS
10 minutes may allow time to explore issues, but is there enough
time for everyone to have their say and end on a positive note?
Extend or combine the methods described above, or try out the
methods described below.
 
10.1 ROUNDS AND ORBITS
Take it in turns to complete a given sentence beginning chosen by
you or by the group. End with appreciation or looking forwards.
For examples see
http://reviewing.co.uk/rounds.htm
 
10.2 MEMORY GAME (STORY TELLING)
The challenge is to talk through what happened in detail. One
person starts in the storyteller's chair and continues until they
are challenged or give up. The challenger takes over until
challenged.
 
10.3 INSTANT ACTION REPLAY (IN THE STYLE OF)
Instant action replay in the style of ... You or they choose film
or TV styles through which to present their replay, e.g. News
Report, Tellytubbies, Shakespearean, Documentary with voice over,
Cartoon, Soap etc.
 
10.4 POSITIONS (SILENT STATEMENTS)
Each person shows their position on an issue by where they stand
on a curved line. Discuss the issue with neighbours, then in the
whole group. End by checking if positions have moved.
 
10.5 CHECKING GOALS & EFFORT (BULLSEYE)
''What did you see as the top three priorities for the group
during the activity?" Everyone stands in a circle just out of
touching distance from each other. Place an object at the centre
that represents priority #1. ''How much effort did you each make
towards achieving that priority? If you (as an individual) made
0% effort, stay where you are. If you made 100% effort towards
achieving priority #1 stand in the centre. Give yourself a score
out of 100 and move to that point on your scale. Look around. Is
there anyone you think should have placed themselves closer to
the centre?'' If time allows, repeat the process for priorities
#2 and #3.
 

5 x 20 MINUTE REVIEWS
You now have many more options, including bringing together what
has happened in shorter reviews.
 
20.1 HAPPY CHARTS
Making and sharing personal happy charts showing each person's
ups and downs during the activity. Encourage participants to look
for differences, similarities and surprises. Encourage questions
such as ''What made you feel so high/low at that point?'' ''Why
did your mood turn round at that point?'' ''What could you have
done to have raised your own happy level or someone else's?''
 
20.2 SCAVENGER HUNT
Individuals or pairs have a list of symbolic objects to find and
share with the group. Examples: Something that reminds me of a
high point. Something that represents how I am in this group.
Something that represents what is missing in this group or a goal
that I would like us to set ourselves. A symbolic present for the
person on my left in the group circle. Something that represents
an opportunity I would like to have in this group.
 
20.3 GUIDED REFLECTION
Participants lie down with their eyes closed while you talk
through the activity with suitable pauses that give them time to
reflect on their own thoughts and feelings. After 5-10 minutes,
end with an opportunity for everyone to speak to each other
one-to-one - especially if the guided reflection leads into a
suitable topic such as thanks, appreciation, encouragement. Or
invite each person to make a statement to the group, such as
''What I like about being in this group and what would make it
even better''.
 
20.4 CHAT CARDS
For a group of 10, write down 5 review questions that you want to
ask, each on a separate card. Explain that the purpose is to
become an expert on your partner's views, and warn that anything
you say to your partner may be shared in the whole group. Shuffle
and deal one card to each pair who discuss the question for 2
minutes before passing it on. In the whole group, discuss each
question, but with participants speaking only for their partners.
Cards are not essential for this process, but they do help to
keep pairs focused on the question.
 
20.5 DISCUSSION
Facilitate open discussion, introducing techniques (if needed) to
encourage participation from everyone in the group. Use any of
the above techniques to help focus, accelerate or deepen the
discussion. You may well need much more than 20 minutes to
conduct a review discussion that respects the diversity of
feelings and opinions in the group AND that generates new
insights AND that encourages further exploration. Many of the
reviewing techniques described above can help to get review
discussions off the ground.
 

TIME TO STOP: TIDY vs. UNTIDY ENDINGS
Once you raise or explore issues, there are no guarantees that
you will come to a tidy endpoint within the time available. The
best you can do might be to establish where you have got to and
what remains unfinished. Providing that there is no distress,
untidy endings can sometimes be better for learning than tidy
ones.
 
A 'tidy' ending might be a new insight or a new commitment or
something you want to try. An 'untidy' ending might be wanting to
change but not knowing how, or having a question you want to
explore, or recognising a problem you want to solve. However you
finish a review, try to keep the momentum going and keep people
thinking about connections.
 
You now have a tidy list of 5 x 5 ideas. The untidiness is that
you have yet to decide what to do with them. I hope you will try
some of them out and let me know how you get on - or send in some
of your own tips for 'quick reviews'. [See next for tips from
readers.]
 
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Key pages in the Active Reviewing Guide:
Methods:
http://reviewing.co.uk/_tools.htm
Books:http://reviewing.co.uk/_books.htm
Workshops:http://reviewing.co.uk/trainingworkshops.htm
Tutorial: http://reviewing.co.uk/learning-cycle
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Easy to print version of the 'Quick Review' section above
 
~ 3 ~ READERS WRITE: MORE FEEDBACK EXERCISES
 
The first 18 exercises were described in the issue about 'Giving
and Receiving Feedback' which you can view at
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/art/3_9.htm
- along with all other back issues of Active Reviewing Tips..
 
The 18 exercises were: Walk and Talk, Paired Walk, Question
Trail, Pausing Action Replays, Pausing Activities, Gifts, Human
Sculpture, Jogger Cards, Buddy Coaches, Rounds, Egoing, 1:1
Observation, Chat Cards, Action Replays - Taking the Part of
Another, First Impressions, Predictions, Feedback about Feedback,
Warm Seat.
 
Did you try any of these? With or without success? With or
without variations? Do you have a story to tell?
 
Thank you to Andi Roberts, Barcelona (19 and 20) and
Mike Cambray, Learning Partnerships, Cumbria  (21 and 22) who
wrote in with some great ideas to add to the list:
 
19: PERSONAL SHIELDS (Andi)
At the start of a course the participant members do a poster
sized personal shield with things like personal past / future and
key strengths and weaknesses. This gets presented to the group
and posted on the wall (we have cork clad walls) Below this a
feedback sheet is placed where people over the duration of the
course may go and add feedback about that person.
 
[Roger comments - 'Shields'  are a protection and defence. Not an
image that fits neatly with being receptive to feedback. So there
could be some real scope here for discussing the need for both
feedback and protection.]
 
20: TORNADO (Andi)
2 lines of seats, divided in pairs and facing each other. The
same amount of chairs as participants. One side always give
feedback and one receive. After every round (time depends on the
type of course) everyone shifts to the seat on their left and
does the same. So eventually everyone is back in their start
place.
Very simple but it works especially done towards the end of a
course and feedback is kept to "positive".
 
21: TASK, TEAM and INDIVIDUAL (Mike)
John Adair's Action Centred Leadership model of three
interlocking circles (Task, Team and  Individual) provides a
useful structure for feedback. After describing the three circles
concept, each person draws three interlocking circles on a piece
of flip, and writes their name on it. The flips are then passed
round the group so that each person can (if they choose) complete
these sentence beginnings in the appropriate circle:
 
TEAM:
"Something I noticed you contributing to the team today was..."
TASK:
"Something I noticed you contributing to task achievement was..."
INDIVIDUAL :
"Something I noticed you adding value to my experience was..."
 
Encourage people to sign their comments in the 'Individual'
circle.  Once the flips have returned to their original owners
they have a chance to read them and share their responses with
the group.
 
22. TAKE IT LYING DOWN (Mike)
This method has been very useful to groups who are having
difficulty getting going with feedback because of the non-verbal
messages that are being passed around.So run a feedback
session with everyone lying on their backs on the floor or
sitting in a circle with chairs facing out. I have noticed that
both seem to help people to listen more attentively and move to
another level of communication.
 
[Roger comments: Does this totally inactive method belong in
'Active Reviewing Tips'? I am delighted to include it because
(a) it works
(b) it's different
(c) people like a rest
(d) contrast and variety of methods is probably more important
than whether they are 'active'
(e) Mike's an old friend and I trust him.]
 
Any advance on 22? Please write to roger@reviewing.co.uk
if you have 'active', 'different' or 'effective' feedback methods
you would like to share. Does anyone use an active version of the
Johari Window or a more person-to-person version of 360 degree
feedback? And what about ways of turning feedback into action
rather than just leaving people to 'stew' or 'glow' with the
comments they receive? Maybe that's a topic for another issue?
 
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
~ 4 ~ LINKS: WHAT IS ACTIVE LEARNING?
 
'ACTIVE LEARNING' AND 'ACTIVE REVIEWING'
 
I was recently asked 'What is Active Learning?'  My answer (to
save you thinking too much) is 'any learning that isn't passive
learning'. I am sorry if this answer disappoints you. But it does
appear to be the current meaning given to the term 'Active
Learning' judging by the articles I have found on the web.
Fortunately some articles get a little more dynamic, and I have
described the best ones below.
 
So where do 'Active Learning' and 'Active Reviewing' overlap and
where do they differ?
 
The learning principles are much the same (which is why I am
telling you about these articles) but here are 5 differences of
emphasis:
 
DIFFERENCES
 
1) Active Reviewing goes MUCH further than 'talking to your
neighbour' - which is one of the 'less active' examples below.
 
2) The typical starting point for Active Reviewing is very
different. Active Reviewing is not about bringing books or
subjects to life - it is more about bringing EXPERIENCES to life.
 
3) Active Reviewing is also about paying attention to the quality
of the (present) learning experience while also paying attention
to the quality of the experience being reviewed.
 
4) Active Reviewing engages people as fully as possible - raising
levels of energy, awareness and intuition.
 
5) Active Reviewing exploits the depth and richness of
communication that is possible when learners are not limited to
verbal communication.
 
SIMILARITIES
Both Active Learning and Active Reviewing aim to develop higher
levels of participation and responsibility in learning - and with
this comes a similar set of values about cooperative learning and
an inclusive and supportive learning environment - which is well
described in the Socratic Seminars article below.
 
ACTIVE REVIEWING IS MORE DYNAMIC AND EXPERIENTIAL
Almost any kind of reviewing could be termed 'Active Learning'
because reviewing is itself a learning activity. So 'ACTIVE'
Reviewing is generally more dynamic and more experience-based
than what is typically understood by 'Active Learning'.
 
Clear as mud? Comments welcome! A good opportunity for active
learning?
 
ACTIVE LEARNING ARTICLES ON THE WEB
 
Promote Active Learning During Lectures by Judith S. Liebman
One simple and very slightly active technique ''Turn to your
neighbour and discuss'' makes a world of difference to
traditional lectures. ''On the end-of-semester course
evaluations, the turn-to-your-neighbor discussions are invariably
singled out for praise.''
http://lionhrtpub.com/orms/orms-12-96/education.html
 
Active and Cooperative Learning
Several articles by Dr. R. M. Felder
who shows that active and cooperative learning is more effective
than the teacher-centred approach
''whether the assessment measure is short-term mastery, long-term
retention, or depth of understanding of course material,
acquisition of critical thinking or creative problem-solving
skills, formation of positive attitudes toward the subject being
taught, or level of confidence in knowledge or skills.''
http://www2.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/
Cooperative_Learning.html [copy & paste into one line, URL may have changed]
 
Socratic Seminars by Jeannie Murphy
Useful detailed guidelines about facilitating good discussions
including good questions to ask and an insightful comparison of
the differences between dialogue (good) and debate (not so good).
The 'Socratic' approach helps to create respect for diverse
ideas, people, and practices, and should result in a positive
learning environment for ALL students.
The focus is studying texts and concepts, but Socratic method has
a much broader application
http://www.lacoe.edu/pdc/professional/socratic.html
 
Why Learning Teams? by Claris Page
How do we learn? Why do we still lecture?
''... our universities continue to teach under a model that was
deemed inappropriate and ineffective almost 100 years ago by some
of the most respected educational theorists of all time.''
Plenty of well referenced ammunition for making the case for
active learning. The only missing reference is the author of this
brilliant page (I believe 'Claris' is the authoring software)
http://www.inov8.psu.edu/teams/why.htm (link may no longer work)
 
Active Training by Mel Silberman
extracts from his book '20 Active Training Progams'
''What to Keep in Mind When Creating Opening Exercises''
recommends using icebreakers that tie in with the purpose of the
training (spot on) but the ''Ten Ways to Obtain Participation''
are a bit on the restful side from my perspective.
http://www.smartbiz.com/sbs/arts/tdc2.htm (link may no longer work)
 
Experiential Learning Theory Bibliography 1971-2001
by Alice and David Kolb
They have reached 1120 entries and are still looking for more!
http://www.learningfromexperience.com/html/research_library.html
 
Experiential Learning ... on the Web by Tim Pickles
This article also takes you to the most relevant pages of the
Guide to Active Reviewing
http://reviewing.co.uk/research/experiential.learning.htm
 
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
~ 5 ~ NEWS: TRAINING WORKSHOPS IN 2001
 
Upcoming OPEN workshops in 2001 are:
 
Portugal (near Lisbon): 12th and 13th February 2001
Details:
http://reviewing.co.uk/portugal/index.htm
 
Hong Kong: February 2001
Details:
roger@reviewing.co.uk
 
UK (North Yorkshire): 3rd-4th May 2001
UK (North Yorkshire): 10th-11th September 2001
Details:
http://reviewing.co.uk/logheights.htm
 
The Netherlands (Elspeet): 24th-25th March 2001
Latest details:
jac@rongen.com or roger@reviewing.co.uk
 
The emphasis of each workshop is different. Please enquire or
click on the links above for more information.
 
FREE ONLINE workshop on outdoor training
Tuesday 17th April 13:00 - 13:45/14:00
hosted by Dr. Roger Greenaway
'Outdoor Training - why, when and how'

 
TRAINING WORKSHOPS IN THE UK
During the period April - December 2001 I will charge no more
than £100 for travelling to anywhere in the UK for workshops of 2
or more days booked at least 2 months in advance. There are such
good special offers on trains and planes that I can get to many
destinations for much less than £100.
 
TRAINING WORKSHOPS OUTSIDE THE UK
With enough warning I can get return fares to most European
destinations for under £200 and most other destinations for under
£400. I will be pleased to investigate flight costs if you are
thinking about hosting a workshop.
 
NEWS AND EVENTS PAGE
http://reviewing.co.uk/_news.htm
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 
~ 6 ~ SITE UPDATE: WHAT'S NEW AT http://reviewing.co.uk
 
ACTIVE LEARNING BOOKS AND REVIEWS
350+ books are categorised under these headings: Facilitation,
Group Facilitation, Reviewing and Reflection, Learning to Learn,
Accelerated Learning, Zen and the Inner Game, Creativity in
Learning, Outdoor Training, Outdoor Education, Training
Activities, Teambuilding, Leadership, Learning Organisations,
Classics, Experiential Learning, Experiential Education, Personal
Development, Learning from Success, Research Methodology,
Evaluation and Transfer.
http://reviewing.co.uk/reviews
 
Is you favourite book about active/experiential learning
included? Please send me an email or take part in the survey at
http://reviewing.co.uk/reviews/survey.htm
The results will be published here in Active Reviewing Tips.
Recommended books will be added to the bookshop.
 
THE ACTIVE REVIEWING CYCLE TUTORIAL
is now available as a 45kb zip file at:
http://reviewing.co.uk/learning-cycle
This makes it easy to follow the tutorial offline or pass
it on to other folk interested in active reviewing.
 
If you have trouble unzipping zip files, you can download Express
Zip (freeware) from
http://www.avantrix.com/exzip.htm to unpack
and extract the compressed files.
 
WHAT'S IT LIKE TO FACILITATE AT YOUR VERY BEST?
The Facilitators' Stories is an inquiry by Stuart Wickes into
facilitators' peak experiences of facilitating at Brathay
Questions asked:
 ~ What do people mean when they say they facilitate?
 ~ What do they actually do?
 ~ What's it like for them to facilitate?
 ~ What's it like to be facilitated by them?
 ~ How does their practice compare with mine and what can I learn
from them?
http://reviewing.co.uk/articles
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~ 7 ~ PAST and FUTURE ISSUES
 
PAST ISSUES of Active Reviewing Tips are archived at
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/index.htm
Topics in past issues include: encouraging participation,
sequencing, transferring learning, reviewing in large groups,
questions for success, developing potential.
 
FUTURE ISSUES of Active Reviewing Tips
Future topics are likely to include:
- metaphors in reviewing (next issue)
- the active reviewing cycle
- more on transfer of learning
- developing decision making skills
- developing group and team skills
- developing leadership skills
- developing learning skills
- competencies in active reviewing
- self-development as a reviewer
- reviewing outdoors
- challenging situations in reviewing
- designing and improvising active reviews
- reviewing at the beginning of a course
- reviewing at the end of a course

POSTSCRIPT
Please get in touch if you have more ideas, comments, or techniques to share about quick reviews. Since this edition I returned to this theme in Reviewing when Short of Time.

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