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SOLO CHALLENGE
[INTRODUCTION] [STRUCTURE] [NOTES & TIPS]

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THE STRUCTURE
OF SOLO CHALLENGE
 

Solo Challenge: the basic structure

There are three highlights in this event:

  1. the negotiation
  2. the challenge
  3. the reporting back
It can be pitched at many levels because adjusting the nature and level of challenge to suit each individual is exactly what the first stage is all about.

To be able to make such adjustments, and for 'Solo Challenge' to work well, people need to have been together for a few days during which they have become a reasonably supportive group, and are ready to welcome a change from the 'routine' of group challenges.

Stage 1: The Negotiation

(approximately 30 minutes)

To get things going, get a lively brainstorming session going, focusing in turn (and briefly) on each person in the group. Ask everyone to come up with ideas for a suitable challenge for that person. Individuals may also suggest challenges for themselves.

I usually throw in lots of rules but these are also subject to negotiation. Therefore you will not find a ready-made set of rules on this page! Here is just one very useful rule: ANYONE CAN VETO ANYTHING. The consequences of this (kind of) rule are typically:

Stage 2: The Challenge

There have been physical challenges, but those requiring creativity and communication have provided the most memorable breakthroughs in personal and group development. For some people it is the negotiation phase at the start that provides most learning - when they are the focus of attention.

What types of 'solo challenges' have come up?

Here are some examples of 'challenges' that have been agreed and carried out:

for a modest person who has achieved a lot:
come back in half an hour and tell us the story of your life in 5 minutes.

for a person who no longer finds time to write for pleasure:
write a poem

for a very academic person:
in 30 minutes greet 10 strangers with an everyday comment about the weather
(''You can say 'Chilly isn't it?' but any technical terms like 'adiabatic lapse rate' or even 'warm front' are not allowed!'')

for a busy non-stop person:
lie down for 30 minutes (in the same place)

for someone not technically minded:
to have a hands-on lesson about a repair to a car engine from someone not very patient (not strictly a 'solo' challenge - but who cares? - see 'rules' below)

a similar pairing as the last example but for learning to play the piano in 30 minutes.

Do all the challenges happen at the same time?

Yes - that's how I have used it. One advantage of activities taking place simultaneously is that it generates a great report back session (see next).

Stage 3: Report Back

Immediately after the 'solo challenges', news and interest value are hot, and report backs are fresh, improvised and unrehearsed. In fact the report back session is often the highlight of the exercise. This can be because:

Next: More Notes and Tips about Solo Challenge

 

[INDEX] TOOLS FOR CHANGE INDEX GUIDE TO ACTIVE REVIEWING

SOLO CHALLENGE
[INTRODUCTION] [STRUCTURE] [NOTES & TIPS]

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HELP

Copyright Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training, who promotes ACTIVE LEARNING via
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