[reviewing.co.uk]
HOME

ACTIVE REVIEWING TIPS
for Dynamic Experiential Learning

[SITE MAPS]
HELP
• practical features about reviewing • news about training workshops
• what's new in the Guide to Active Reviewing

ARCHIVES   FREE Subscription   CONTENTS of this issue

Active Reviewing Tips 2.9   Active Reviewing (part 1)

Active Reviewing Tips for Dynamic Experiential Learning
http://reviewing.co.uk
Active Reviewing Tips 2.9 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ISSN 1465-8046

~ ~ A C T I V E . R E V I E W I N G . T I P S
~ ~ FOR DYNAMIC EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
~ ~ the free monthly newsletter associated with the
~ ~ 'GUIDE TO ACTIVE REVIEWING' http://reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Editor: Roger Greenaway roger@reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Vol. 2.9
~ ~ ACTIVE REVIEWING ARTICLE (Part 1)
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

CONTENTS (TOP)

FROM THE EDITOR

In the Chinese language, I am told, there is a symbol that
represents both opportunity and crisis. So when my modem packs up
and most of my files and messages disappear, I try very hard to
see the opportunities ........................................

......maybe I'll write about that another time.

Meanwhile, here is part 1 of my 'recycled' article about Active
Reviewing. Maybe this IS an opportunity after all. Rather than
throwing isolated ideas at you, here is an article that draws
together some of the key principles and practices of active
reviewing into one article. Here is your opportunity to get an
overview of what 'active reviewing' is all about.

This article is published in two parts because some of you may
have a size limit for the emails you receive. (You or your
service provider may have set a limit.)

And after two months without any Active Reviewing Tips, perhaps
you have an appetite for a longer 2-part issue?

If you prefer to read the full version of this article from the
web, please find your way to:
http://reviewing.co.uk/actrev.htm

CONTENTS (TOP)

A NEW trainer-training workshop with
Roger Greenaway
Reviewing Skills Training
==========================
HOW TO TRANSFER LEARNING
and give your training lasting impact
==========================
Experience-based training has impact. But how do you ensure that
the impact leads to valued, significant and transferable change?
By taking part in this practical 2 day workshop you will learn
how to improve the chances that the full benefits of your
training are transferred to the 'real' world.

As a participant you will gain ...

* an understanding of key issues in the transfer of learning.
* the know-how to make learning experiences more transferable.
* an expanded toolkit of reviewing techniques that assist
transfer
* first-hand experience of 'transfer planning'

==== DAY 1 ====

TRANSFER, TRANSLATE OR TRANSFORM
* Who does what to assist transfer?
* Key issues about transfer
* Doing nothing about transfer
* What you can do before, during and after training events to
promote transfer

THINKING LINKING
* Warm-ups and skills development
* Mind opening exercises
* Association games
* Physical games
* Creative thinking exercises
* Systematic comparisons
* Pattern making
* Parallel worlds
* Developing learning skills

TRANSFER WITHIN A TRAINING EVENT
* Linking by design vs. linking by review
* 'Do-Review-Apply' within a course.
'* Do-Review-Apply' within an activity.
* Reviewing how transfer is happening
* Re-reviewing to find new associations

TRANSFER BEYOND A TRAINING EVENT
* When and how to focus on the future
* Reviewing how transfer is happening
* Models of transfer: bridging the gap with your favourite
vehicle for change.
* Transfer plan = action plan + learning plan
* Writing 'smart' objectives with muscle!
* Rehearsing 'what if' scenarios

==== DAY 2 ====

MAKING TRANSFER INEVITABLE
* Growth, capacity and potential
* Storing success
* Working with stories and metaphors
* Working at different levels

MAKING LEARNING READY TO USE
* hooks - internal and external
* talking with different people about the course

CUSTOMISING LEARNING TRANSFER
* travelling alone
* creating and using support
* action plans or learning plans?
* preferred learning style

BEYOND TRANSFER
* translating and transforming
* what do you do with unfinished learning?
* evaluation measures and supports transfer

Roger Greenaway is the author of Playback and other books and
articles about reviewing.  Roger provided his first
trainer-training courses in reviewing at Brathay in the early
eighties. He was awarded a doctorate in 1995 for a study entitled
'Powerful Learning Experiences in Management Learning and
Development'. Roger now provides reviewing skills training and
consultancy in the UK and abroad.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

CONTENTS (TOP)

A C T I V E . R E V I E W I N G . [Part 1]

WHEN WORDS ARE NOT ENOUGH
The purpose of reviewing is to assist the process of learning
from experience. This paper outlines some active approaches to
reviewing that offer a way forward when words are not enough, or
when words get in the way.


ACTIVE REVIEWING
Active reviewing improves our ability to learn from experience.
Most active reviewing is simple, basic and direct. Used wisely it
can enliven and sharpen the process of reviewing experience.

INTEGRATING THE WORLDS OF TALK AND ACTION
* Over-reliance on words can restrict our ability to learn from
experience, however articulate or inarticulate we may think we
are.
* Talk and action tend to inhabit distinct and separate worlds,
especially when there is a clear demarcation line between doing
and reviewing.
* The more separate these worlds, the less likely it is that
learning from experience is happening.
* Active reviewing is brings these worlds closer together, by
narrowing the gap between theory and practice.


THE BENEFITS OF ACTIVE REVIEWING
The benefits arising from the habit of active reviewing can
include:

* More effective learning from experience
* An improved confidence in translating words into action, trying
out ideas, making decisions happen, and turning plans into
reality
* Soundly based resolutions and action plans. The transition of
learning from a course is more likely to happen if plans for the
future have already been rehearsed in some way while on the
course.
* Language is more likely to be used accurately, responsibly and
sensitively. When language and action are no longer 'safely'
separated, the quality of communication can only improve.


ACTIVE REVIEWING complements discussion-based methods - it does
not replace them.
There is a risk that active reviewing might be seen as
'anti-language' or as an attack on the value of verbal reviewing.
It is the trainer's responsibility to maintain a suitable balance
between language, action and any other media which are used for
reviewing. Active reviewing methods simply extend the choices
available for learning from experience.


PREPARING FOR ACTIVE REVIEWING

SETTING UP NEW LANGUAGES
It is useful to have a wide range of options instantly available
when reviewing. If a trainer intends to use active techniques
during a review, an earlier session involving communicating
through action can prime the group for using 'active language'.
'Active Images' is an example of setting up and using a new
language:

ACTIVE IMAGES
On a course which has 'teamwork' and 'leadership' as themes, each
group member can be asked to demonstrate an ideal active image of
'teamwork' by directing the rest of the group in a short
realistic or symbolic presentation. These presentations can then
be readily adapted during later reviews to illustrate how the
group is actually working as a team, and to represent people's
changing views about teamwork or leadership.

SETTING UP CONVENTIONS
A number of games, communication exercises or movement exercises
can be used to set up a range of conventions for use during
reviewing. Strict observance of conventions can be just as vital
to the success of a review as it can be to the success of a game.

A group which already knows various conventions and has
experienced their value, is more likely to be responsive when
such conventions are re-introduced during a review.

The discipline of 'rounds' or of 'sustained silences', or the
precedent of moving everyone else or of freezing during action -
these are just some of the conventions that can be valuable
during reviewing.

CONVENTIONS FOR CONVENTIONS
If conventions are simply established by default (e.g. that
people always sit in the same places and keep to the same pecking
order in group discussions), then it is unlikely that effective
reviewing will get off the ground. By making alternative
conventions available in advance, trainers create more room for
manoeuvre during reviews - both for themselves and for
participants.


EXAMPLES OF ACTIVE REVIEWING

ACTION REPLAYS
(improvised group re-enactments of a group event)
Action replays are the basis of many active reviewing techniques.
The purposes and variations of action replays are endless. The
nine purposes listed below cover three broad areas: CLARIFYING
what happened, CELEBRATING what happened, and INVESTIGATING what
happened:

    CLARIFYING
* keeping everyone in the group informed about what others were
doing (especially where a group has split into smaller units
during an activity)
* informing others outside the group about a group event (or
possibly just to update the trainer following an independent
exercise)
* reconstructing a distant or complex event (to help people
recall and relive the facts and feelings of an event)

    CELEBRATING
* celebrating a success (and appreciating more about what
contributed to the success)
* helping people to see the serious side of a humorous incident
(or vice-versa)

    INVESTIGATING
* agenda-raising (using an action replay as a sweep search for
issues to review)
* awareness-raising (bringing out different points of view and
disagreements)
* focusing on issues which participants have found difficult to
recognise or confront during the activity
* analysing a problem (similar to reconstructing the scene of a
crime)


ACTION PRE-PLAYS (or rehearsals)
Pre-plays (or rehearsals) are a natural development of action
replays. They simply focus on future possibilities rather than on
past events. Acting out alternative courses of action is more
committing than talk, but is less committing than the real thing.
* pre-plays create quick and convenient  opportunities for second
attempts (compared to real second attempts). There may also be
fewer distractions from key issues.
* pre-plays create opportunities for experimenting with
alternatives
* individuals can swap roles with each other, leading towards
criticism becoming more constructive...

     [end of part 1 of this article.
    See ARTips 2.10 for the continuation]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

DO YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE?


If you want to READ more about ACTIVE REVIEWING

1) Do nothing! Just continue with your free subscription to
Active Reviewing Tips and you will receive a monthly(ish) dose of
practical ideas for active reviewing.

2) Search http://reviewing.co.uk There's now a full text search
box at the top of the home page from where you can navigate this
220+ page site - mostly about reviewing, and quite a lot about
outdoor learning.

3) Use http://reviewing.co.uk to find related sites. You will
find useful links throughout the site.

4) Go to http://reviewing.co.uk/pbk.htm and learn more about
Playback online. (You can also buy a copy from here.)


If you want practical face-to-face TRAINING on the subject

1) Take a look at http://reviewing.co.uk/_wkshops.htm for a full
list of workshops or write to me at roger@reviewing.co.uk
You will find a menu of workshops to choose from, but in most
cases the workshops I provide are customised one-off events to
meet the needs of a particular staff team.

2) Stay subscribed to this ezine in which I will advertise any
open workshops that I am providing in the UK or in other
countries.


If you want to HOST a customised or open workshop, please write
to me at roger@reviewing.co.uk


  DON'T JUST DO IT -

    ACTIVELY REVIEW IT !!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

MORE APOLOGIES - AND THANKS

The results of the last Active Reviewing Tips Survey were amongst
the casualties in my recent data disaster. Thank you to those who
took part. I'll look after your replies better next time!

Thank you to Paul at http://www.learningfountain.com and Frank at
http://bemorecreative.com for giving Active Reviewing Tips a
mention. Both Paul and Frank provide excellent ezines that I have
been subscribing to for some time. But the subscription details
disappeared along with everything else - so I'll tell you more
about them in the next issue!

ARCHIVES   FREE Subscription   CONTENTS of this issue


 INDEX to reviewing.co.uk - resources for dynamic learning
HOME
 How to find your way around reviewing.co.uk
HELP
Copyright © Roger Greenaway, Reviewing Skills Training, who promotes ACTIVE LEARNING via
TRAINING EVENTS, CONSULTANCY, HANDBOOKS, RESEARCH, CONFERENCES, and EZINES