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Giving and Receiving Feedback


Active Reviewing Tips 3.9   Giving and Receiving Feedback
  1. INTRO: Giving and Receiving Feedback
  2. TIPS: 18 Active Feedback Exercises
  3. LINKS: Using Photos in Reviewing
  4. NEWS: workshops and new e-tutorial
  5. PAST and FUTURE ISSUES

Active Reviewing Tips for Dynamic Experiential Learning
-
http://reviewing.co.uk

Roger Greenaway's Active Reviewing Tips 3.9 ~ ISSN 1465-8046
This free opt-in publication from Reviewing Skills Training
reaches over 1000 enlightened people a bit like you.
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Welcome to the new subscribers who have joined since March.
This issue marks the re-launch of Active Reviewing Tips as a
monthly publication. Thank you readers old and new for your
patience and for your encouraging emails!
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IN THIS ISSUE

  1. INTRO: Giving and Receiving Feedback
  2. TIPS: 18 Active Feedback Exercises
  3. LINKS: Using Photos in Reviewing
  4. NEWS: workshops and new e-tutorial
  5. PAST and FUTURE ISSUES


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ A C T I V E . R E V I E W I N G . T I P S
~ ~ FOR DYNAMIC EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
~ ~ the free monthly newsletter associated with the
~ ~ 'GUIDE TO ACTIVE REVIEWING'
http://reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Editor: Roger Greenaway roger@reviewing.co.uk
~ ~ Vol. 3.9
~ ~ GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK
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~ 1 ~ INTRO: GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK.

What picture does the title 'GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK'
generate in your mind. Close your eyes for a few seconds and look
at your mental picture....

What did you see?
- two people?
- sitting down?
- one giving, the other receiving?
- a special event that doesn't happen very often?
- a power game?
- an ordeal?
- important things left unsaid?

Or did you see ...
- lots of people?
- moving around
- everyone giving and receiving?
- a frequent event that is part of a friendly learning culture?
- an empowering exercise?
- a fun and satisfying experience?
- focused on what matters?

Or did you see something altogether different?

If you regret not closing your eyes, you can make up for it now
by trying this exercise ...

Hold you hands just above your desk and try to recall the number
of times that you have received valuable feedback during the last
7 days.

For each occasion that you RECEIVED valuable feedback, place one
finger of your left hand on the desk.

For each occasion that you have GIVEN valuable feedback, place
one finger of your right hand on your desk.

Now look at your fingers.

Did you run out of fingers or are they still hovering in the air?

You have just been doing some (slightly) active reviewing. You
have been making pictures in your mind (perhaps). And you have
been tapping your fingers on your desk (surely!).

In a LEARNING culture feedback is part of the LEARNING game. In a
POWER culture, feedback is part of the POWER game. However
carefully givers of feedback choose their words, it is the
quality of the culture and the quality of the relationships that
will determine the extent to which feedback can be a source of
valuable learning.

If you placed lots of fingers on your desk just now, the chances
are that you work in an excellent LEARNING culture. If one or
both of your hands stayed hovering in the air, the chances are
that you work in a POWER culture.

It is in power cultures that feedback sessions get a bad name -
such as 'slate a mate'. But the same feedback activity in a
learning culture could be a way of making friends - not losing
them.

Weblink: Tim Pickles explores some of these themes in the context
of appraisal sessions in the workplace. See:  Where Next for
Appraisals?


The Tips section (next) describes 18 active feedback exercises.
Please write to
roger@reviewing.co.uk if you can help to make
this a rounder number.

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~ 2 ~ TIPS: 18 ACTIVE FEEDBACK EXERCISES

In structured learning events there are many things you can do to
create a learning culture in which feedback can thrive. Here are
some of my favourite feedback methods.

1. WALK AND TALK
Write down a question about yourself that you would like everyone
else to answer.
Wander around asking your question to each person you meet.
Present a summary of the feedback you received to the whole
group.
What question would you would like to ask next time?

2. PAIRED WALK
With a partner walk out to an agreed point and back.
On the way out one person asks for feedback about their
performance in the last exercise.
On the way back the other person asks for feedback.
Find another partner for a second walk. This time start by
summarising the feedback you have just received before asking for
more.

3. QUESTION TRAIL
In twos or threes follow a trail (outdoors) picking up a question
at each marker you come to. Each person should answer the
question before arriving at the next marker. Example: one of the
questions might be ''What surprised you most about me in the last
activity?''

4. PAUSING ACTION REPLAYS
During an action replay of the event (whether using video or
re-enacting the event) pause the action and ask what each person
was feeling or thinking at the time. Good places to pause are
when one person has done or said something to which others are
reacting.

5. PAUSING ACTIVITIES
Warn in advance if you are likely to do this. I prefer to make
only brief interruptions so as not to disrupt the activity too
much. Ask for a show of fingers to indicate (say) motivation
levels: 10=motivated 0=unmotivated. This is particularly useful
if a leader seems out of touch with how people are responding -
or if an unconfident leader doesn't realise how well they are
doing.

6. GIFTS
Subgroups make gifts to present to individuals in other
subgroups. See:
http://reviewing.co.uk/feedback.htm

7. HUMAN SCULPTURE
Individuals take it in turns to arrange the rest of the group
around them - with positions, postures and expressions that they
feel represent that person's attitude towards them during the
event being reviewed. Described in Playback

8. JOGGER CARDS
Each participant writes 2 or 3 personalised action points on
separate cards and gives them to an observer. If the observer
feels the person needs reminding or praising, they quietly do so
by showing the card together with a thumbs up (praise) or thumbs
down (memory jogger).

9. BUDDY COACHES
One to one observation during an activity. During time outs the
coaches provide feedback to their buddy. Guidance to coaches will
depend on what kind of coaching style you are encouraging (e.g.
positive, critical, try ..., notice ..., or a question)

10. ROUNDS
A sentence completion exercise in the whole group. To make it a
feedback exercise choose suitable sentence beginnings e.g. ''I'd
like to congratulate''. To ensure everyone gets equal attention,
focus each round on a different individual e.g. ''I'd like to
congratulate Ross on the way ...''

11. EGOING or SPEAKING FOR A PARTNER
During the review each person in one half of the group remains
silent while their buddy takes part in the review as if they
actually are their buddy. This can bring out a lot of intuitive
indirect feedback.

12. 1: 1 OBSERVATION
Participants do not know exactly what is on the observer's
checklist (or guidance notes). This minimises the chances that
participants will 'fake' their behaviour. To ensure this exercise
does not result in unwanted feedback, ensure that the observers
are only looking for positives

13. CHAT CARDS
Twos or threes work through about 20 questions (one per card) in
about 10 minutes. This is a fast-paced exercise that may lack
depth, but can be fun and highly intuitive. It should result in
each person getting an all-round picture of themselves during the
event being reviewed - about 20 'snapshots' if working in pairs
or 40 'snapshots if working in threes.

14. ACTION REPLAYS - TAKING THE PART OF ANOTHER
Following one-to-one observation (half the group doing and half
the group watching) the observers re-enact the activity as if
they are the person they were observing. Role swaps can also take
place during a whole group re-enactment. Seeing people stepping
into your shoes can be a very powerful form of feedback - but it
can also be careless or misunderstood. So ask if anyone was
puzzled or confused ... or impressed and delighted! See
http://reviewing.co.uk/stories/replay.htm

15. FIRST IMPRESSIONS
This is how I saw you to start with. This is how I see you now.
This feedback can be provided through words, pictures or actions.
The final message should be a positive one.

16. PREDICTIONS
Each person writes down a prediction about how well each other
person will perform in an activity that they have never done
before. Before doing this new activity, predictions are shared in
the whole group together with the reasons underlying the
predictions. It is not necessary to do the activity - but doing
the activity usually leads to even greater insights.

17. FEEDBACK ABOUT FEEDBACK
It is important to give learners a chance to express their own
views about the value of the feedback they are receiving. Do they
feel it is too critical, too shallow, too repetitive, too
general, too embarrassing? Such sessions quickly reveal if any
individuals are disappointed with the quality of the feedback
they are receiving. Include a session of this kind while there is
still plenty of time to ensure that everyone gets enough time to
give and receive more feedback.

18. WARM SEAT
An improvement on the hot seat. The receiver of feedback is in
control of the whole process. See:
http://reviewing.co.uk/feedback.htm

19. ?
Thank you to Rajaram Subbian who has taken up the challenge and adds this feedback exercise that collects positives and then seeks explanation:

POSITIVE FEEDBACK + EXPLANATIONS
This is done with the group that is familiar with its members. Break the large group into small (four or five in each group). Each member is to note down three or four positive qualities observed in others (each by name) and on self! After everyone has completed, within each group a feedback is given in an agreed order, starting the feedback on one person - each person saying what s/he has noted down. While doing this members are encouraged to look eye-to-eye and say it using their names, so as to make it personal and impactful! The listener, after having listened would say what s/he has noted down on self. S/he is also encouraged to seek explanation from the reporter on the observation made.


20: ? Write to roger@reviewing.co.uk if you would like to add an
idea or two.

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~ 3 ~ LINKS: FREE PHOTO PROCESSING

Did you know that you can send your 35mm films or digital photos
to be processed and stored on the web for free. This is a very
quick and easy way of sharing photos during or after a course.
(If you want them printed and sent to you then you do have to
send them some money.)

This kind of service could really help with the transfer of
learning after a course - not only continuing the sense of
community - but also because it extends the chances for learners
to find images that capture important aspects of their learning
experience.

http://www.ofoto.com (USA)
http://www.photoisland.com

I think these services have been around for about a year. Have
you used them to assist with reviewing or the transfer of
learning. Please share your thoughts - and tell us the url where
we can see your photos!

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~ 4 ~ NEWS

OPEN TRAINING WORKSHOPS 2000

My next OPEN workshop in reviewing skills is in Hertfordshire
(near London) on Sunday 12th and Monday 13th November 2000. There
are enough bookings for the event to happen, but there are still
a few spaces left. If you want to know more, please send an email
to me at
roger@reviewing.co.uk

If you don't live anywhere near North London but are interested
in attending or hosting an open workshop in your home town, I'll
be pleased to hear from you.

E-LEARNING TUTORIAL: THE ACTIVE REVIEWING CYCLE

If you have attended one of my workshops this year you have
probably seen this playing cards model. This is my first full
write up of the model. I explain the symbolism, and I illustrate
how various active reviewing methods match the 4 zones of the
cycle.

The TRANSFER section briefly shows how transfer can happen in any
zone. I welcome your comments on this experiement in e-learning -
and on the model itself.

http://reviewing.co.uk/learning-cycle/index.htm

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~ 5 ~ ACTIVE REVIEWING TIPS: PAST AND FUTURE

PAST ISSUES
New subscribers. You may want to take a look at these selected
past issues - or search the archives at
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/index.htm

Encouraging Participation
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/art/3_2.htm

Transferring Learning
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/art/2_7.htm

Reviewing in Large Groups
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/art/2_6.htm

No Questions Asked
http://reviewing.co.uk/archives/art/2_2.htm

FUTURE ISSUES
The list of potential topics is continually growing.
It includes:
- more on the topic of transfer of learning
- more on feedback exercises
- the active reviewing cycle
- developing decision making skills
- developing group and team skills
- developing leadership skills
- developing learning skills
- competencies in active reviewing
- self-development as a reviewer
- reviewing outdoors
- difficult situations in reviewing
- designing and improvising active reviews
- achieving specific objectives in reviewing
- reviewing at the beginning of a course
- reviewing at the end of a course
- would you really miss metaphors?

If you would like to request particular reviewing
topics or contribute to them please let me know at
roger@reviewing.co.uk

Take a look at this growing collection of feedback exercises for
more ideas about giving and receiving feedback.

Each month Active Reviewing Tips brings you:
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